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Lausanne is a Diploma Programme (DP) school. The Diploma Programme framework capitalizes on the inquiry-based, holistic classroom skills learned and applied in Lower and Middle School. This allows students to focus on discipline-specific curricula that are enriched by interdisciplinary collaboration. It also allows students to explore areas of interest in each of six content areas in preparation for college and life outside Lausanne.

 

 

Eleventh Grade

Eleventh-grade students at Lausanne take classes designed to prepare them for university-level work. They continue to enhance research skills while improving time-management skills. 

With our College Advising team's support, students in the eleventh grade prepare their college application materials. They work closely with their counselor to refine a college and universities list best suited to their interests and career aspirations. Students also work to find shadowing and internship opportunities in fields they may wish to pursue. 

Eleventh-grade students begin the year by visiting various college campuses as a part of their class college trip. As they tour large universities, small liberal arts colleges and a mixture in between, they begin to develop preferences for what they want in their own college experience. The tours create a great learning environment, showing students how to explore academic options and find their "right fit" institution.  

Students continue to receive guidance on their academic journey throughout the school year and participate in mock interview sessions with college representatives and Lausanne alumni. Resume writing workshops, career exploration sessions and essay brainstorming workshops led by college advising help students with the application process. Weekly meetings focused on college advising begin in the spring and optional trips to college campuses during Spring Break. With representatives from over 130 different colleges and universities visiting Lausanne annually, students have the opportunity to form their vision for life after Lausanne. 

Traditions like Homecoming, ArtsFest SportsFest and Junior/Senior Banquet prepare our eleventh-grade students for their senior year. 

Twelfth Grade

The twelfth-grade year for Lausanne students is an eventful year of closure and anticipation. Students are balancing the demands of the college application process with final preparations for their culminating IB assessments. Those in the IB Diploma Programme are completing their essays, which culminate many years of hard work. 

Twelfth graders benefit from the previous three years of personalized attention and the relationships forged with the college advisors. They complete their college applications and ultimately make decisions on the university to attend. Students and parents meet 1-on-1 at the beginning of twelfth grade to create a targeted and personalized college application list based on their academic profile, personal goals and professional plans. Together, they review application deadlines and identify potential scholarship opportunities.  

Seniors also attend the College Application Bootcamp held in the fall to learn tips and best practices for filling out the applications. The students participate in weekly group college advising sessions in the fall during advisory and prepare for college and scholarship interviews by participating in individualized mock interview sessions. 

Prom and Graduation are just two of the many annual events celebrating Lynx's work throughout their years on campus. Some other senior traditions include Senior Send-Off, Freshmen/Senior Appreciation Week, Junior/Senior Banquet, Senior T-Shirt Walk-Through and Senior Run-Through. 

As our seniors move their tassels and toss their caps after graduating, they end their time as Lausanne students and become new members of the Lausanne alumni family. Ready to employ all they have learned at Lausanne. 

Lausanne Lifelong Learning Program

The Lausanne Lifelong Learning program is a program that will be done through advisory and is designed to ensure that students have a well-balanced life through reflection on activities done in school and outside of school. It is based on the IB’s CAS program and its three components: creativity, action, and service. Students will work with their advisor and reflect on the activities they do.

The Lausanne Lifelong Learning program builds on the school’s identity as an IB school that prepares students for college and life in a global environment. It seeks to help students in the Upper School build a well-rounded experience for themselves in their time at Lausanne and learn from those experiences.

By working with their advisor in reflecting on the things they do outside of school, they will create meaningful learning that goes beyond the experience itself to help become a better person.

This program is built around the model of the Creativity, Action, and Service (CAS) program as designed by the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). Students will be expected to participate in this program for all four years of high school unless they enter the full diploma program to transition to the full IB CAS program, described below:

  • Creativity denotes anything that involves creative thinking. Traditional examples include the arts, music, and other areas generally associated with creativity. Still, other examples include Model UN, Model Congress, Destination Imagination, and other activities that require creative thinking on the part of the students.
  • Action denotes anything that involves physical exertion that contributes to a healthy lifestyle. Traditional examples include sports, but other examples include hiking, dancing in a performance, physical fitness plans and more.
  • Service denotes involvement in the community in a way that serves to better the lives of both the giver and the recipient of the service. Traditional examples include participation in service organizations. Other examples include tutoring, mentoring and more. Students are expected to do activities in all three areas in their time at Lausanne. They will work closely with their advisors over the four years to make sure their actions are meaningful and goal-oriented. They will also complete a project in their junior year, as well as an internship. 

Academic Honors Recognition

Proud of its strong curriculum and academic heritage, Lausanne Collegiate Schools’ faculty and administrators recognize and celebrate the accomplishments of our students. These ceremonies take place throughout the school year at convocation, assemblies, and special programs.

The Cum Laude Society

The faculty members of The Cum Laude Society at Lausanne review eleventhth and twelfth grade student scholarship and award membership to those students who demonstrate exemplary scholarship through their cumulative GPA, IB Scores/Predicted Scores, standardized assessment scores and level of coursework taken during their upper school program. Lausanne is one of a very select number of schools in the nation that offer this recognition to exceptional student scholars. Cum Laude membership is equivalent to Phi Beta Kappa membership at the collegiate level. Students with exceptionally high GPAs, College Admissions Test Scores and enrollment in the IB Programme are considered by a faculty committee for membership. Juniors are held to a very high standard of achievement and fewer eleventh grade students are admitted to membership than twelfth grade students. A limit is placed on the committee of inductees by the National Charter for Cum Laude.

National Honor Society

Students in the eleventh and twelfth grade with a cumulative GPA of 3.75 and above are eligible for membership in our chapter of the National Honor Society. This process takes place during the first trimester of the school year. Students will be provided information on potential membership in NHS during the spring trimester and again in the first trimester to ensure students are well aware of the key characteristics of citizenship, honor, leadership and service that are required for election into the society. Students will use their Naviance software to develop a resume of involvement and leadership that the NHS faculty committee will review in order to be considered for membership. 

Selection of Valedictorian and Salutatorian

The selection of the valedictorian and salutatorian is based on the following criteria: Both the valedictorian and the salutatorian must be eligible for a cum laude, magna cum laude or summa cum laude diploma. These diplomas are awarded based on the above Quality Point Scale. Transfer students are eligible if they have attended Lausanne for four full, consecutive semesters and including all three trimesters of their senior year.

In comparing the ranking point averages of transfers to other students, only the grades for semesters and trimesters of common attendance at Lausanne will be compared. The final selection of valedictorian and salutatorian will be announced at Baccalaureate. If the top-ranking students are within a hundredth of a point of each other, numerical averages may be computed to make the final determination.

If the top-ranking students are within thousandths of a point, a tie can be declared. Each Lausanne Collegiate School student’s progress in coursework will be evaluated in a formal fashion on a periodic basis and communicated to the parents. The basis of this evaluation will include the student’s grasp of the subject’s content as quantified via quizzes and tests, as well as a more subjective evaluation of the qualitative learning exhibited through the skills of problem-solving, assessed for grades five through twelve.

Faculty members will assess students’ progress in a fashion that can be meaningfully reported to parents and to other educators. The type of assessment being used in each class must be written in the syllabus for each subject in the Middle School and Upper School, and in the class orientation packet for Lower School. All divisions will send home trimester report cards. Academic progress can be accessed for grades five through twelve on the internet. If a parent is concerned about low grades on papers brought home or a pattern of “no homework tonight” is stated by the student, the parent should call the division office, e-mail or send a note to the teacher inquiring about the child’s   refer to the class’s website for all current assignments and grades.

Student Assessment

The faculty measures the progress of students using MYP standards, DP standards, and Vertical Team Benchmarks and Skills.

In IB Diploma classes, the yearly grade is the average of grades from three terms and a final exam. In IB Middle Years Programme classes, the yearly grade will be determined by the skill level the student reaches at the end of the year. No grade can exceed 100%.

Short-term assessments are returned to the students in a timely manner, usually within a twenty-four hour period. Long-term, more substantive assessments are returned to students within one to two weeks.

Students may take all graded assessments home when completed. If parents are not receiving the graded work in a timely manner, please contact the teacher immediately.

Standardized Testing

Lausanne Collegiate School will assess student aptitude and performance periodically through the use of published, standardized testing instruments designed to assist in the evaluation of student aptitude and performance comparable to educational settings elsewhere. Testing materials and individual scores will be held in the confidential status they merit. Administrators and faculty will analyze testing results as one means of evaluating curriculum and teaching methodologies. Lausanne uses standardized tests in order to achieve the following goals:

  • To identify applicants possessing the aptitude and general knowledge base from which successful acclimation to Lausanne may be predicted
  • To evaluate the curriculum
  • To determine individual student scholastic aptitude and achievement
  • To assist individuals in making educational decisions
  •  To facilitate college entry

The following is a list of the instruments currently in use, the purpose for which they were designed by the publisher and the grade level at which they are administered:

  • Educational Records Bureau-ISEE (Independent School Entrance Examination)
    This is used as part of the admission process for students entering grades five through twelve.
  • Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT)
    Preparation for SAT; employed in educational and college counseling; scholarship qualifying test for eleventh grade. This test is also given in grades nine and ten (as a practice test).
  • ALIS
    Predictive and adaptive test used to help teachers support students in their IB classes. Taken at the start of grade eleven.
  • Scholastic Aptitude Test I and the Test of Standard Written English (SAT I)
    Required for college admission; students are asked to schedule and attempt for the first time by the end of grade 11. We do not offer special on-campus testing for students with learning plans.
  • Scholastic Aptitude Test II (SAT II) (formerly Achievement Tests)
    A supplemental requirement for admission to certain colleges; for students in grades ten, eleven and twelve.
  • American College Test (ACT)
    Required for college admission; students are asked to schedule and attempt for the first time by the end of grade eleven. We offer special testing on campus for students with approved accommodations for the ACT twice a year, in October and February.
  • International Baccalaureate External Assessments; grades eleven and twelve
    All students, unless otherwise noted, are expected to take the IB External Assessment for the IB class they are taking. All students will pay a registration fee with the IB of $172. Each subject examination is $119. Students in the full Diploma Programme will pay $886 in total for all classes. They are not responsible for the fee for the Theory of Knowledge assessment, the Extended Essay, or the Creativity, Action, and Service program.

Graduation Requirements

Lausanne’s graduation requirements are developed to ensure that students meet the entry requirements of the best universities, as well as fulfill IB class requirements.

To graduate, each student needs to have credits in the following areas:

  • English 12 credits
  • Social Studies 9 credits (6 must be history)
  • Mathematics 12 credits
  • Sciences 9 credits (6 must be lab sciences)
  • World Languages 9 credits (recommended consecutive same language)
  • Fine Arts (Performing or Visual Arts) and/or Design 3 credits (6 credits starting with Class of 2022)
  • Electives 9 credits
  • Personal Project/CAS Fulfillment of requirement through the advisory program

    *Total 63 credits (66 starting with Class of 2022)

Quality Points (Awarded at Graduation) Having satisfied course requirements, designations will be awarded as follows based on total earned quality points:

  • Honors 216 quality points
  • Cum Laude 252 quality points
  • Magna Cum Laude 270 quality points
  • Summa Cum Laude 288 quality points

Calculations are based on a 4.0 scale over all four years of upper school.

The curriculum offerings in the Upper School serve students through a sequential program of college- preparatory and college-level courses. This program prepares our students to take full advantage of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme or International Baccalaureate Certificates during their junior and senior years. We are focused on being the premier independent school in Memphis and one of the world's best. Our faculty is prepared to help students become inquirers, knowledgeable, thinkers, communicators, principled, open-minded, caring, risk-takers, balanced and reflective.

English

  • DP English SL

DP English Literature, Standard Level, is a course designed to develop and strengthen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of teacher-initiated and student-centered activities. These activities incorporate and advance ideas related to literature, history, culture, political and natural environments, and interpersonal and intrapersonal relationships with the goal of furthering critical thinking and promoting international-mindedness. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to communicate effectively in speaking and in writing about a wide range of topics related to literature. Formal and informal oral presentations, as well as formal and informal written tasks are a requirement and will be based upon a selected group of primary texts and related secondary sources. Students will be evaluated through tests and quizzes, formal compositions and informal writings, including specific analyses and commentaries, frequent oral assessments, and projects. At the end of the two-year sequence, students will take the IB External Assessment consisting of one oral commentary on a passage from one of the texts studied and two written exams. In addition, students at the Standard Level will send to the IBDP one world literature paper that they prepared during the junior year. Assessment standards for SL and HL classes are slightly different although the assessments themselves are the same.

  • DP English HL

DP English Literature, Higher Level, is a course designed to develop and strengthen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of teacher-initiated and student-centered activities. These activities incorporate and advance ideas related to literature, history, culture, political and natural environments, and interpersonal and intrapersonal relationships with the goal of furthering critical thinking and promoting international-mindedness. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to communicate effectively in speaking and in writing about a wide range of topics related to literature. Formal and informal oral presentations, as well as formal and informal written tasks are a requirement and will be based upon a selected group of fifteen primary texts and related secondary sources. Students will be evaluated through tests and quizzes, formal compositions and informal writings, including specific analyses and commentaries, frequent oral assessments, and projects. At the end of the two-year sequence, students will take the IB External Assessment consisting of one oral commentary on a passage from one of the texts studied and three written exams. In addition, students at the Higher Level will send to the IBDP one world literature paper that they prepared during the junior year. Higher Level students are required to present more analysis in writing and are required to include more detail and longer responses during oral assessments. Assessment standards for SL and HL classes are different although the assessments themselves are the same.

Individuals & Societies

  • DP Business SL

The DP Business Management course develops an understanding and application of business theory, principles, and practices through an integrated study of key business functions – organization/management, marketing, human resources, operations and finance. This Standard Level (SL) course provides an examination of how individuals and groups interact in a dynamic and increasingly competitive business and organizational environment with limited resources. It encourages a holistic view of the business world through an exploration of six overarching concepts: globalization, ethics, culture, innovation, change and strategy. The two-year course culminates with two externally graded, essay-style exams based on business case studies, and a written commentary on a challenge facing a real-world company of the student’s choice.

  • DP Business HL

The Higher Level (HL) study of Business Management course is a more in-depth study of the concepts and techniques covered in the SL level, with emphasis on strategic analysis and mastery of more complex business quantitative tools and skills. The course culminates with two essay exams based on business case studies. Students will also design a project and formal research paper in which they use primary and secondary research to investigate a real-world challenge facing an existing company, apply business tools, analyze possible solutions, draw conclusions and make recommendations. This course will prepare the student for college-level study of business and management, and to be a savvy consumer.

  • DP 20th Century World History

This two-year course is a study of topics in 20th century world history. DP History SL consists of two examinations and one internal assessment. For Paper 1, a skills-based assessment, students will compare Civil Rights in the US and apartheid South Africa. For Paper 2, students will study world history topics including: the causes, practices and effects of 20th century wars (case studies include the Second World War, the Chinese Civil War and the Cuban Revolution); authoritarian states (specifically those of Joseph Stalin, Mao Zedong and Fidel Castro); and superpower tensions during the Cold War. Finally, students will also complete the IB Internal Assessment, in which students get to be historians, picking a topic of personal interest, finding sources and conducting their own investigation.

  • DP History Of the Americas HL

This two-year course is a study of topics in 20th century world history and US history (with an emphasis on globalizing American history). DP History HL consists of three examinations and one internal assessment. For Paper 1, a skills-based assessment, students will compare Civil Rights in the US and apartheid South Africa. For Paper 2, students will study world history topics including: the causes, practices and effects of 20th century wars (case studies include the Second World War, the Chinese Civil War and the Cuban Revolution); authoritarian states (specifically those of Joseph Stalin, Mao Zedong and Fidel Castro); and superpower tensions during the Cold War. For Paper 3, students will study a range of US history topics that consolidate and expand studies for previous papers. For example, students will learn about the US Civil War and Reconstruction, the fight for civil rights (particularly for indigenous peoples, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, women and LGBTQ+ people) and the political history of Latin America. Finally, students will also complete the IB Internal Assessment, in which students get to be historians, picking a topic of personal interest, finding sources and conducting their own investigation.

  • DP Social and Cultural Anthropology SL

The social and cultural anthropology course explores humankind in all its diversity through the comparative study of culture and society. Anthropology contributes to an understanding of contemporary issues, such as gender, ethnicity, religion, the environment, globalization, human rights, inequality and poverty, technology, and violence. This course offers critical insight into the continuities as well as dynamics of social change and the development of societies, and challenges cultural assumptions. SL students learn the methods of observation and asking questions about their own cultures and others and will produce a written report based on observation and field notes for the Internal Assessment. External assessments consist of two written papers, demonstrating anthropological knowledge, understanding, and analysis of cultural similarities and differences.

  • DP Social and Cultural Anthropology HL

The social and cultural anthropology course explores humankind in all its diversity through the comparative study of culture and society. Anthropology contributes to an understanding of contemporary issues, such as gender, ethnicity, religion, the environment, globalization, human rights, inequality and poverty, technology, and violence. This course offers critical insight into the continuities as well as dynamics of social change and the development of societies, and challenges cultural assumptions. HL students conduct and report a field study to demonstrate understanding of anthropological concepts, apply them to ethnographic data, and produce sound analysis and anthropological insight into cultural behavior. HL external assessment consists of two written papers, incorporating theoretical perspectives on cultural similarities and differences.

  • DP Economics SL

The purpose of the DP Economics SL course is to encourage students to analyze how individuals, institutions, and societies deal with the central problem of scarcity. In the first year of the course, students will examine this issue from a microeconomic level (decisions made by individuals and specific institutions and firms), as well as macroeconomic (decisions made by entire nations/economies). In the second year of the course, students will explore issues in international economics (free trade, trade protectionism, exchange rates, balance of payments, etc.) and investigate global challenges in achieving economic development. SL students learn much of the same material as the HL students, they simply are not required to do many calculations and they cover some topics in less detail than the HL students. The two-year program concludes with an external examination worth 80%, and with an internal assessment (Economics Portfolio) worth 20% constructed throughout the course.

  • DP Economics HL

The purpose of the DP Economics HL course is to encourage students to analyze how individuals, institutions, and societies deal with the central problem of scarcity. In the first year of the course, students will examine this issue from a microeconomic level (decisions made by individuals and specific institutions and firms), as well as macroeconomic (decisions made by entire nations/economies). In the second year of the course, students will explore issues in international economics (free trade, trade protectionism, exchange rates, balance of payments, etc.) and investigate global challenges in achieving economic development. Unique to HL, students will cover extension topics which are extra depth and breadth studies of Theory of the Firm, comparative advantage, and various calculations to name a few. The two-year program concludes with an external examination worth 80%, and with an internal assessment (Economics Portfolio) worth 20% that is constructed throughout the course.

  • DP Psychology SL

The course provides students with an understanding of the interaction of biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on human behavior. Students are encouraged to adopt an integrative approach based on scientific and investigative methods. The areas of psychology that will be addressed during the first year include the physiological origins of human behavior, language and thinking, memory, emotion, and sociocultural interaction. During the second year, students will learn more about abnormal psychology through the psychodynamic level of analysis as well as the psychology of human relationships which focuses on the complexity of interpersonal relationships. The internal assessment is conducted in the fall of the second year and requires the student to replicate a simple experiment they design, conduct and analyze. The external assessment consists of two parts for SL which requires the student to write essays on core material, optional material, and qualitative research.

  • DP Psychology HL

DP psychology provides students with an understanding of the interaction of biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on human behavior. Students are encouraged to adopt an integrative approach based on scientific and investigative methods. The areas of psychology that will be addressed during the first year include the physiological origins of human behavior, language and thinking, memory, emotion, and sociocultural interaction. During the second year, students will learn more about abnormal psychology through the psychodynamic level of analysis as well as the psychology of human relationships which focuses on the complexity of interpersonal relationships. The internal assessment is conducted in the fall of the second year and requires the student to replicate a simple experiment they design, conduct and analyze. The external assessment consists of three parts for HL which requires the student to write essays on core material, optional material, and qualitative research.

Math

  • DP Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations SL

The DP Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations SL course is designed for students with varied backgrounds and abilities. More specifically, it is designed to build confidence and encourage an appreciation of mathematics and the use of math in the real world. Students taking this course need to be already equipped with fundamental skills and a rudimentary knowledge of basic processes in mathematics. This course concentrates on mathematics that can be applied to contexts related as far as possible to other subjects being studied, to common real-world occurrences and to topics that relate to home, work and leisure situations. In this course, students must produce a project, a piece of written work based on personal research, guided and supervised by the teacher. This process allows students to ask their own questions about mathematics and to take responsibility for a part of their own course of studies in mathematics. The students most likely to select this course are those whose main interests lie outside the field of mathematics, and for many students this course will be their final experience of being taught formal mathematics. All parts of the syllabus have therefore been carefully selected to ensure that an approach starting with first principles can be used. As a consequence, students can use their own inherent, logical thinking skills and do not need to rely on standard algorithms and remembered formulae.

  • DP Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations HL

The DP Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations HL course is designed for students who are interested in describing the real world and solving practical problems using mathematics. They should also be interested in using technology alongside mathematics to develop and use models of real world situations. Students taking this course should have strong mathematics fundamentals and a sound understanding of algebra. This course is intended to meet the needs of students whose interest in mathematics is more practical than theoretical but seek more challenging content. Major focuses of this course will be an in-depth study of Trigonometry, Statistics, and Calculus concepts in an applied nature. Students will also be required to produce an exploratory project, researching a topic of their choosing from the course syllabus. This exploration allows the students to develop a deeper understanding of learned concepts, and to take responsibility for a part of their own course of studies in mathematics. The students most likely to select this course are those who are looking to study subjects such as social sciences, natural sciences, statistics, business and economics, psychology, or design, where mathematics is necessary in an applied light. The scope and depth of the course requires an additional 90 hours of instruction compared to the SL course. Students wishing to study mathematics in a less rigorous environment should therefore opt for one of the standard level courses.

  • DP Mathematics SL: Analysis and Approaches

The DP Mathematics SL: Analysis and Approaches course is designed for students who already possess knowledge of basic mathematical concepts, and who intend to pursue mathematics at university or college subjects that have a large mathematical content. It is for students who enjoy a theoretical approach to mathematics and also enjoy problem solving and exploring real and abstract applications with and without the use of technology. This course focuses on introducing important mathematical concepts through the development of mathematical techniques. The intention is to introduce students to these concepts in a comprehensible and coherent way, rather than insisting on extreme mathematical rigor. The course includes the study of a variety of integrated math topics, yet does not require the hours and rigor of the HL level. Students should, wherever possible, apply the mathematical knowledge they have acquired to solve realistic problems set in an appropriate context. In this course, students must produce a project, a piece of written work based on personal research, guided and supervised by the teacher. The project provides an opportunity for students to carry out a mathematical investigation in the context of another course being studied, a hobby or interest of their choice using skills learned before and during the course. This process allows students to ask their own questions about mathematics and to take responsibility for a part of their own course of studies in mathematics.

  • DP Mathematics HL: Analysis and Approaches

The emphasis of DP Math HL: Analysis and Approaches is the study and use of analytic methods with an in depth study of advanced calculus – appropriate for pure mathematicians, engineers, scientists, economists, and those with an interest in analytic methods. This subject is aimed at students who will go on to study subjects with substantial mathematics content such as mathematics itself, engineering, physical sciences, or some economics courses.The nature of the subject is such that it focuses on developing mathematical arguments, problem solving and exploring real and abstract applications, with and without technology. Students will also be encouraged to develop the skills needed to continue their mathematical growth in other learning environments. A variety of math topics will be explored to give the students a wide scope of integrated topics. In this course, students must produce a project, a piece of written work based on personal research, guided and supervised by the teacher. This process allows students to ask their own questions about mathematics and to take responsibility for a part of their own course of studies in mathematics. This course is a demanding one, requiring students to study a broad range of mathematical topics through a number of different approaches and to varying degrees of depth. The scope and depth of the course requires an additional 90 hours of instruction compared to the SL course. Students wishing to study mathematics in a less rigorous environment should therefore opt for one of the standard level courses.

Science

  • DP Biology HL

The purpose of this course is to instill in each student an appreciation for and understanding of the global interdependence of all living things; and the exquisite and intricate ecological balance of life on this planet in all its biodiversity. To this end, students will be engaged in laboratory activities covering cellular components and the varied processes which maintain life. Students will also study anatomy and physiology, learning how we function and maintain physical health. In addition, we will explore (among other topics) advanced genetics, biotechnology, and virology. Since one arena of study will be the laboratory, it is also a goal of this course to develop and fine-tune the students’ procedural skills as they investigate the varied topics through experimentation and observation both individually and as a team. Students will further enhance their knowledge of these areas of study by researching related topics and concepts utilizing both community and international resources; and then demonstrating their command of the material by writing papers, creating PowerPoints and videos, and developing presentations. In addition, additional HL-only topics will be covered to allow further depth in biology. Sixty hours of documented labs along with the group 4 project in the 2nd year will be an integral part of the course.

  • DP Chemistry SL

Chemistry Standard Level (SL) is a course of study that will mirror a first year principle of chemistry course at the college level. Topics that will be covered include basic scientific reasoning and experimental procedures, atomic structure and chemical bonding, reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibrium, acid/base reactions, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. SL and HL cover a common core syllabus, a common internal assessment (IA) scheme, and some overlapping elements in the options section. SL students will not be required to go into as much depth of the material as the HL students. In addition, fewer topics will be given and the extension material is less demanding in the common options. The goals of this course will be to master the information from the IB syllabus designated for SL and to increase problem solving and laboratory skills that would normally be asked of to complete a first year college chemistry course. For the IA, students will be required to design and set up labs, perform them, collect data, calculate results, and evaluate post-lab data in terms of error and logical assessments of those errors. Thirty hours of documented labs along with the group IV project will be an integral part of the course.

  • DP Chemistry HL

Chemistry Higher Level (HL) is a course of study that will mirror a first year principle of chemistry course at the college level. Topics that will be covered include basic scientific reasoning and experimental procedures, atomic structure and chemical bonding, reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibrium, acid/base reactions, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. SL and HL cover a common core syllabus, a common Internal Assessment scheme, and some overlapping elements in the options section. HL students will be required to go into greater depth of the material, to study additional topics, and to study extension material in a more demanding nature in the common options. The goals of this course will be to master the information from the IB syllabus designated for HL and to increase problem solving and laboratory skills that would normally be asked of to complete a first year college chemistry course. For the Internal Assessment, fifty hours of documented labs along with the group 4 project in the 2nd year will be an integral part of the course.

  • DP Enviromental Systems and Societies HL

Environmental Systems and Societies is an interdisciplinary course which focuses on the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies and gives students the opportunities to assess the scientific, ethical, and political impacts of numerous environmental topics. The eight major areas focused on in the course include: Foundations of environmental systems, Ecosystems and ecology, Biodiversity and conservation, Water and aquatic food production systems and societies, Soil systems and terrestrial food production systems and societies, Atmospheric systems and societies, Climate change and energy production, and Human systems and resource use. Students will be expected to participate in hands-on research and investigation, case study analysis, innovation of solutions, and evaluation of environmental impacts. Students will also participate in a Group 4 project and conduct an Individual Investigation as part of their 30 hours of documented laboratory work. The overall goals of the course is to improve student awareness and critical analysis of environmental concerns and how such concerns relate to individuals and societies at a variety of scales – both local and global. Students will also focus on sustainability and responsible actions that could maintain finite resources.

  • DP Physics SL

DP Standard Level (SL) Physics is a course study that includes Newtonian Mechanics, Thermal Physics, Waves, Electricity and Magnetism, Circular motion, Energy and the environment, and Atomic and Nuclear Physics. In addition, students are required to complete additional work related to either Engineering physics, Astrophysics, Digital imaging or Relativity. An additional 40 hours of laboratory time will be required, over this two year course. A project in the 2nd year (the Group 4 project) will also be an integral part of the course. The main goal of this class is to make the student familiar and well-versed with a variety of relevant physics topics.

  • DP Physics HL

DP Higher Level (HL) Physics is a course study that covers all the topics listed in DP SL Physics but to a deeper level. Topics include Newtonian Mechanics, Thermal Physics, Waves, Electricity and Magnetism, Circular Motion, Energy, and Atomic and Nuclear Physics. In addition, DP Physics HL covers topics covering Engineering Physics and Relativity, both special and general. This course includes a minimum of 60 hours of laboratory work required over the course of the two years. A project in the 2nd year (the Group 4 project) will also be an integral part of the course. The strength of DP Physics HL program is in its close connection to today’s most relevant topics in physics and technology.

  • DP Sports, Exercise and Health Science SL

This course incorporates the traditional disciplines of anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, psychology and nutrition and looks at them in the context of sports, exercise and health. Students will cover a range of core and option topics and carry out practical (experimental) investigations in both laboratory and field settings. This will provide an opportunity to acquire the knowledge and understanding necessary to apply scientific principles and critically analyze human performance. Where relevant, the course will address issues of internationalism and ethics by considering sport, exercise and health relative to the individual and in a global context. Forty hours of documented labs along with the group 4 project in the 2nd year will be an integral part of the course.

  • DP Computer Science HL

DP Computer Science HL will give students an understanding of the fundamental concepts of computational thinking as well as knowledge of how computers and other digital devices operate. Students will need to think procedurally, logically, concurrently, abstractly, recursively and think ahead. They will utilize an experimental and inquiry-based approach to problem-solving, developing algorithms and expressing them clearly. They will also appreciate how theoretical and practical limitations affect the extent to which problems can be solved computationally. There are no prerequisites for this course, however, some previous exposure to programming is desirable.

World Languages

  • DP French ab inito SL

This course seeks to help students develop basic-high to intermediate-low linguistic skills while developing an intercultural understanding of their culture and those of French-speaking countries. This course focuses on the study of five prescribed themes, Identities, Experiences, Human Ingenuity, Social Organization and Sharing the Planet, and the study of different text types. This will allow students to compare the target language and culture(s) to other languages and cultures with which they are familiar. The students are assessed in receptive, productive and interactive skills (Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing). These assessments seek to prepare students for the IB prescribed external and internal assessments. SL students are required to invest 150 hours of class time/work by the end of the two-year sequence. Students enrolled in this class must take the DP French ab initio examination at the end of the second year.

  • DP French SL

This two-year sequence course seeks to guide the student in the acquisition of the French language in order to become lifelong learners; the development of language skills; the increased intercultural understanding of Francophone cultures with an understanding for the interaction between Francophone cultures and their own culture; and the understanding of literary texts and extracts. This course focuses on the study of five prescribed themes, Identities, Experiences, Human Ingenuity, Social Organization and Sharing the Planet, and the study of different text types. This will allow students to compare the target language and culture(s) to other languages and cultures with which they are familiar. The students are assessed in receptive, productive and interactive skills (Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing). These assessments seek to prepare students for the IB prescribed external and internal assessments. SL students are required to invest 150 hours of class time/work by the end of the two-year sequence. Students enrolled in this class must take the DP French B SL examination at the end of the second year.

  • DP Mandarin ab initio SL

This course seeks to help students develop basic-high to intermediate-low linguistic skills while developing an intercultural understanding of their culture and those of Chinese-speaking countries. This course focuses on the study of five prescribed themes, Identities, Experiences, Human Ingenuity, Social Organization and Sharing the Planet, and the study of different text formats. These will allow students to compare the target language and culture(s) to other languages and cultures with which they are familiar. The students are assessed in receptive, productive and interactive skills (Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing). These assessments seek to prepare students for the IB prescribed external and internal assessments. SL students are required to invest 150 hours of class time/work by the end of the two-year sequence. Students enrolled in this class must take the IB Mandarin ab initio examination at the end of the second year.

  • DP Mandarin SL

This two-year sequence course seeks to guide the student in the acquisition of the Mandarin language in order to become lifelong learners; the development of language skills; the increased intercultural understanding of Chinese cultures with an understanding for the interaction between Chinese cultures and their own culture; and the understanding of literary texts and extracts. This course focuses on the study of five prescribed themes, Identities, Experiences, Human Ingenuity, Social Organization and Sharing the Planet, and the study of different text types. This will allow students to compare the target language and culture(s) to other languages and cultures with which they are familiar. The students are assessed in receptive, productive and interactive skills (Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing). These assessments seek to prepare students for the IB prescribed external and internal assessments. SL students are required to invest 150 hours of class time/work by the end of the two-year sequence. Students enrolled in this class must take the DP Mandarin B SL examination at the end of the second year.

  • DP Spanish ab initio SL

This two-year sequence course seeks to help students develop basic-high to intermediate-low linguistic skills while developing an intercultural understanding of their culture and those of Spanish-speaking countries. This course focuses on the study of five prescribed themes, Identities, Experiences, Human Ingenuity, Social Organization and Sharing the Planet, and the study of different text formats. These will allow students to compare the target language and culture(s) to other languages and cultures with which they are familiar. The students are assessed in receptive, productive and interactive skills (Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing). These assessments seek to prepare students for the IB prescribed external and internal assessments. SL students are required to invest 150 hours of class time/work by the end of the two-year sequence. Students enrolled in this class must take the DP Spanish ab initio examination at the end of the second year.

  • DP Spanish SL

This two-year sequence course seeks to guide the student in the acquisition of the Spanish language in order to become lifelong learners; the development of language skills; the increased intercultural understanding of Hispanic cultures with an understanding for the interaction between Hispanic cultures and their own culture; and the understanding of literary texts and extracts. This course focuses on the study of five prescribed themes, Identities, Experiences, Human Ingenuity, Social Organization and Sharing the Planet, and the study of different text types. This will allow students to compare the target language and culture(s) to other languages and cultures with which they are familiar. The students are assessed in receptive, productive and interactive skills (Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing). These assessments seek to prepare students for the IB prescribed external and internal assessments. SL students are required to invest 150 hours of class time/work by the end of the two-year sequence. Students enrolled in this class must take the DP Spanish B SL examination at the end of the second year.

  • DP Spanish HL

This two-year sequence course seeks to guide the student in the acquisition of the Spanish language in order to become lifelong learners; the development of language skills; the increased intercultural understanding of Hispanic cultures with an understanding for the interaction between Hispanic cultures and their own culture; and the understanding of literary texts and extracts. This course focuses on the study of five prescribed themes, Identities, Experiences, Human Ingenuity, Social Organization and Sharing the Planet, and the study of different text types. This will allow students to compare the target language and culture(s) to other languages and cultures with which they are familiar. Additionally, HL students are required to study two literary works originally written in the target language. The students are assessed in receptive, productive, interactive and analytical skills (Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing). These assessments seek to prepare students for the IB prescribed external and internal assessments. HL students are required to invest 240 hours of class time/work by the end of the two-year sequence. Students enrolled in this class must take the DP Spanish B HL examination at the end of the second year.

Visual Arts

  • DP Visual Arts SL

Prerequisite: Departmental approval

The IB Diploma Programme Visual Arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundaries. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem-solving and divergent thinking, while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art-makers. In addition to exploring and comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in different contexts, students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary practices and media. The course is designed for students who want to go on to study visual arts in higher education as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through the visual arts.

  • DP Visual Arts HL

Prerequisite: Departmental approval

The IB Diploma Programme Visual Arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundaries. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem-solving and divergent thinking, while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art-makers. In addition to exploring and comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in different contexts, students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary practices and media. The course is designed for students who want to go on to further study of visual arts in higher education as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through the visual arts. As compared to IB Visual Art SL, IB Visual Arts HL challenges students further with more in-depth study, as is required by the International Baccalaureate Organization.

Performing Arts

  • DP Theatre Arts SL

The theatre course emphasizes the importance of working individually and as a member of an ensemble. Students are encouraged to develop the organizational and technical skills needed to express themselves creatively in theatre. A further challenge for students following this course is for them to become aware of their own perspectives and biases and to learn to understand and value those of others. This requires a willingness to understand alternative views, to respect and appreciate cultural diversity, and to see the varied role that theatre plays in reflecting these. At the core of the theatre course lays a concern with clarity of understanding, critical thinking, reflective analysis, effective involvement and imaginative synthesis—all of which should be achieved through practical engagement in theatre. Preparation for Theatre Assessments begins in the first year and continues throughout the second year. These assessments include: preparing a Director’s Notebook; Researching a World Tradition; and Creating a Collaborative Original Piece of Theatre.

  • DP Theatre Arts HL

The theatre course emphasizes the importance of working individually and as a member of an ensemble. Students are encouraged to develop the organizational and technical skills needed to express themselves creatively in theatre. A further challenge for students following this course is for them to become aware of their own perspectives and biases and to learn to understand and value those of others. This requires a willingness to understand alternative views, to respect and appreciate cultural diversity, and to see the varied role that theatre plays in reflecting these. At the core of the theatre course lays a concern with clarity of understanding, critical thinking, reflective analysis, effective involvement and imaginative synthesis—all of which should be achieved through practical engagement in theatre. Preparation for Theatre Assessments begins in the first year and continues throughout the second year. These assessments include: preparing a Director’s Notebook; Researching a world Tradition; and Creating a Collaborative Original Piece of Theatre. In HL a Solo Piece of Theatre based upon research of a particular Theatre Theorist is the final assessment.

  • DP Dance HL

This course focuses on the composition, performance and analysis of dance, or “expressive movement,” which is practiced amongst peoples of various backgrounds, and for a variety of purposes, throughout the world. Students create, participate in, and reflect upon dance forms and styles from a range of cultures and traditions, both familiar and unfamiliar. The HL dance course aims to help students to understand dance as a set of practices with their own histories and theories, and to understand that these practices integrate physical, intellectual and emotional knowledge. Upon completion of the course students will experience dance as an individual and collective exploration of the expressive possibilities of bodily movement and understand and appreciate mastery in various dance styles, traditions and cultures. The DP dance student will recognize and use dance to create dialogue among the various traditions and cultures in their school environment, their society and the world at large. The assessments for DP Dance HL include: an external assessment comprising of three dance works composed by the student and a written reflection documenting the processes of composition and analysis of one of the dances, a formal written report analysing the similarities and differences between two dance styles drawn from different dance cultures and/or traditions, and two or three dances (solo/duet/group but at least one must be a solo or a duet) in any style or styles, performed by the student to show proficiency and expressive ability appropriate to the dance. Students who wish to enroll in DP Dance HL must be currently or previously enrolled in Dance Performance or study dance outside of Lausanne.

Design

  • DP Design Technology SL

IB Design Technology is a multi-disciplinary course that draws on areas of knowledge that includes science, business, and art. Students will learn and delve into a complete design research and strategy, culminating in the creation of a product. Students will have the option to further develop their product into a company offering that will be created in other classes at Lausanne. They will learn the marketing and feasibility of new products through analysis of a design opportunity, testing, and evaluation. While in the art module, they will learn conceptual design and development of design using idea development and concept modeling. Lastly, science would complete the intersection by incorporating new technology and manufacturing processes into the production process. This course is a unique combination of design discipline brought together by a common thread of craft, materials, marketing, problem solving, informed creativity and innovative thinking. Students would be working on analysis of data, observation, and research to inform their creative process.