CLOSE
Enter your search term and press enter. Press Esc or X to close.

Middle Years Programme Curriculum

Lausanne offers the Middle Years Programme (MYP) of the International Baccalaureate for students in grades 5–10.

The Middle Years Programme at Lausanne prepares students for success in school and to become lifelong learners. It provides a learning structure that emphasizes the development of a challenging intellect that encourages students to make connections between their traditional studies and the real world. Middle Years Programme learners are motivated to be creative, critical and reflective thinkers.

Lausanne's Middle Years Programme (MYP) curriculum begins in fifth grade and continues through the tenth grade. This continuity of academic approach helps ensure students have an easier transition from Middle to Upper School academically. With each year vertically-aligned, Lausanne students build the skills to tackle the more rigorous subject matter. Students are prepared and empowered to face the challenge of the Diploma Programme in eleventh and twelfth grade.

 

 

Fifth Grade Overview

Fifth grade is a transition year for Lausanne students. Students move beyond a single classroom setting into different learning spaces like science labs. As they enter this phase, they also take on a larger course load, become more independent, and explore their passions and interests with greater focus.

Lausanne's International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme prepares students for academic excellence while meeting their individual needs and nurturing their curiosity and sense of wonder. Students in fifth grade are encouraged to think creatively while also challenging themselves and their peers to reach new heights.

Fifth-grade students are encouraged to become active members of the Lausanne family as well as active participants in their own learning.

Sixth Grade Overview

No longer new to Middle School, sixth-graders navigate the Lausanne campus with more confidence and have new opportunities to learn beyond the classroom. They also explore their interests with a greater focus. The foundation they build paves the way for continued success as they continue their Middle School journey.

Academic challenges increase for our Lausanne sixth-grade students as they progress through the Middle Years Programme and prepare for the transition into Upper School. Students make connections beyond traditional curricular boundaries and draw on the skills of our faculty as they traverse projects, guest speakers and cultural outings. 

Seventh Grade Overview

Lausanne seventh-grade students develop habits of learning that continue to define them in years to come while also helping them discover their passions. 

Students experience the fine arts as well as athletics with the numerous opportunities presented across campus. 

The Middle Years Programme causes seventh-grade students to also push themselves intellectually with challenging courses that prepare the Lynx for Upper School and beyond.

Eighth Grade Overview

As the leaders of the Middle School, Lausanne eighth-grade students draw on the skills they have learned to take greater intellectual risks while also exploring their passions and interests with more focus.

Lausanne eighth-grade students have their academic, social, emotional and physical growth developed and are guided as they refine their passions and identify things that apply to the world beyond the classroom.

Our Lynx are encouraged to be independent learners and continue to develop a range of critical thinking skills as our Middle Years Programme provides each student with a comprehensive foundation and a sense of how to best advocate for themself as a learner.

Ninth Grade Overview

Ninth grade is an exciting time in the life of a Lausanne student. With the start of Upper School comes increased freedom. Students have more classes available to them and more options for extracurricular clubs, programs, and sports.

Ninth grade is also a time when new high school friendships are formed. This helps Lynx enjoy an even broader social dynamic with their peers.

Beginning in ninth grade, a college advisor meets with each family to discuss their student’s aspirational college goals. After reviewing the results from PSAT testing, the advisor helps interpret current admission trends for the family to set attainable goals and develop a plan for success. Students receive guidance on what courses, internships and extracurricular activities will help them move forward through their academic journey.

Yearly traditions like Freshmen/Senior Appreciation Week offer students fun as students acclimate to Upper School life. 

Tenth Grade Overview

As tenth-grade students finish the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme, students refine their approaches to learning skills, equipping them with the self-awareness and knowledge to take on more challenging work in the eleventh and twelfth grades.

One of the defining achievements for a tenth grader is completing the Personal Project, a project in which students define, research, and present a topic of their choosing.

In tenth grade, students and parents meet with their college advisor to assess academic progress and address any early intervention concerns. They review the results from the student’s latest PSAT testing and, together, build a personalized preparation and testing schedule for the student’s eleventh-grade year. Tenth-grade students also begin to create their college resumes, conduct mock college interviews with advisors and start to meet with college admissions representatives on campus at Lausanne.

 

The Middle Years Programme offers eight subject groups that focus on Sciences, Mathematics, Language and Literature, Language Acquisition, Arts, Physical and Health Education, and Design.

The Middle Years Programme approaches learning holistically by addressing students' intellectual, social, emotional and physical development. The Programme focuses on the traits of the Learner Profile and the skills developed through the Approaches to Learning prepare students to become problem solvers and active participants within the community.

Students who complete the Middle Years Programme are more prepared for their academic requirements and the next step in their education.

English

  • Language & Literature, Grade 5

In fifth grade, students are introduced to a year-long experience using Greek morphemes. Since Greek morphemes make up approximately 40% of the English language, this vocabulary program provides tools to decode new words and meanings in reading and all their subjects. Different genres are explored throughout the year, along with learning to write in that style: Historical fiction, realistic fiction, non-fiction, and Fantasy/Mythology. Active listening and public speaking skills are taught explicitly and practiced, empowering students to become effective communicators.

  • Language & Literature, Grade 6

In sixth grade Language and Literature, students enhance their skills in four core areas: analysis, organization, producing text, and using language. We read four core texts: Wonder by RJ Palacio, The Giver by Lois Lowry, The Outsiders by SE Hinton, and The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne. With each of these texts, we explore themes of courage, kindness, loyalty, freedom, and the importance of staying true to yourself. Each book also focuses on the variety of ways you can be an upstander in your community and standing up in the face of injustice. Students learn active reading strategies such as annotation to interact with the text and focus on how authors develop themes that relate to real-world scenarios. All year, students practice finding relevant evidence to support their claims with these annotations. They learn to justify their choice of evidence with detailed explanations. They engage with each of their texts through written analysis, ranging from 3 to 5-paragraph essays. After written analysis, students dive deeper into the content with projects to express their creativity and explain their creative choices in relation to their novels. Students learn to use organizers to guide their thoughts in the writing process. They complete peer reviews and learn how to use feedback to make necessary changes as an important part of the writing process. Students use No Red Ink throughout the year as a grammar program. They take the skills from this program and apply them to Latin Morpheme vocabulary quizzes and tests. On these tests, students are asked to use their vocabulary words in sentences with context clues. They must use the words correctly according to the correct part of speech. Theme analysis, non-fiction and fiction texts, organization and transitions, annotations, vocabulary, and editing are essential parts of sixth Grade Language and Literature.

  • Language & Literature, Grade 7

Students in seventh grade Language & Literature focus on the four Language Arts components: writing, reading, speaking and listening. Students in this course are expected to do the following: engage in independent, self-selected readings as well as teacher-assigned readings; read for meaning and thematic analysis in literature; make associations and connections between literature and real-world concepts; learn to analyze different types of selections (such as short stories, novels, primary source documents, biographies, informational literature, and other non-fiction); increase vocabulary skills, and be able to evaluate and draw inferences from informational text using a variety of sources and media.

Students are also expected to self and peer edit multiple genres of writing. Students will write persuasive compositions where they support their claims with evidence, explain the purpose of using certain evidence, and properly use MLA format regarding format and in-text citations. Students will also practice summarizing, responding to literature, and other skills related to their journey towards becoming prepared for the eighth grade in compliance with the MYP standards. Students will study grammar and syntax to increase verbal and written skills. Students will also practice their discourse and strategic competence in speaking and listening comprehension skills through their active listening skills, which are composed of several stages; receiving, understanding, evaluating, remembering, and responding to information received through the vocal transmission.

  • Language Arts, Grade 8

Language Arts 8 is based on the study of literary genres, using them to provide models to foster creative and interpretive student writing development. Students will analyze various forms of literature and compose different writing types based on the literary works--including non-fiction essays, novels, poetry, and drama--read in class. Language Arts 8 reinforces grammar through No Red Ink, and vocabulary is included as a separate study to be integrated into all writings.

  • English, Grade 9 

This freshman course is rooted in the study of various literary genres and styles, using them to provide models to foster the development of creative and interpretive writing and thinking and enhance student reading fluency. In the interest of preparing new Upper School students in an MYP environment, students will identify and deconstruct elements and devices found in literature, build an academic vocabulary, and practice oral presentations. Special topics include developing a research question, outlining, using MLA in-text documentation style, organizing an essay, integrating textual evidence, using transitions, revising for sentence sense, and reviewing grammar and punctuation rules. Preparation for standardized testing is provided to enhance skills in this area, especially with the PSAT test, which is administered as practice in ninth grade. Vocabulary is included as a parallel study to be integrated into all writings. The class will also focus on close reading and interpretation of various types of literature.

  • English, Grade 10 

This sophomore course is designed to increase the student's ability to structure and organize more effective paragraphs and essays and develop a more powerful and complex prose style. Students will write frequently and in a variety of forms, both expository and creative. They will practice writing as a process as well as focus on oral presentations and oral commentaries. Special emphasis will be placed on applying the rules of correct grammar and sentence revision for more powerful expression. Spelling, vocabulary skills, and PSAT preparation will be addressed. World literature will be read and discussed to enhance the writing program. Important components of this course include MYP-related skills such as writing appropriate research questions, outlining, integrating textual evidence, creating an annotated bibliography, and constructing a critical analysis using MLA in-text documentation style, as well as exploring other stylebooks for various disciplines. The class will also focus on close reading and interpretation of various types of literature.

Individuals & Society

  • Individuals & Societies, Grade 5

Fifth graders step back in time to learn about Prehistory and the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, China and India. They learn about humans' complex lives through the lenses of geography, religion, achievements, politics, economy, and social structure. Students use their knowledge to understand the impact on today's world.

  • Individuals & Societies, Grade 6

In Sixth Grade, students look at present times through Ancient History. We study the major themes of Social Studies like Geography, Economy, Government, and Human Rights through directed Units of inquiry. The course begins with an intentional building of community and understanding of various cultures and diversity. We then move into Human Rights, where students study, reflect on, and evaluate Speeches and, in turn, deliver a Human Rights Speech of their own. We then pick up where fifth grade left off and investigate the rise and fall of empires, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance Period, and the Age of Enlightenment. Throughout the year, the students use their knowledge of what they learned in their units of inquiry to develop their own country with our culminating project, Global Endeavors. Students replace a country in the world, take on their population, geography, but can change their government, economic system, constitution, and military. This combines everything the students have learned from ancient civilizations and the present-day struggles we see in the world. Students create and present this in front of their peers and faculty.

  • Individuals & Societies, Grade 7

Students in seventh grade will learn about the history of the United States. From the first Americans up to the 20th Century. As we learn about history, we will be looking at various perspectives on the impact of major events in the past. We will learn about the country's history through 8 historical themes:
- Patterns of Population
- Power
- Trade and Exchange
- Access to Resources
- Expressing Identity
- Science, Technology and the Environment
- Spirituality and Morality
- Rights and Responsibilities

  • Individuals & Societies, Grade 8

In Eighth Grade, the first trimester's focus is laying the foundation of world globalization. Our studies began with defining what globalization looks like in today's world and how we got to where we are. Our first unit is studying the Industrial Revolution in Europe and investigating how technology changes and the need for industrial growth led to powerful nations expanding into less powerful lands in search of resources. This aim takes us into our second unit, Imperialism, where we study European, American, and Japanese expansionism around the globe.

Our second-trimester focus is to connect Europe's industrial growth and the quest for imperial prestige during the 1800s to the outbreak of the First World War. We study how the fascination with military growth, alliances, imperialistic expansion and nationalistic pride led to powerful nations in Europe entrenching themselves in a long four-year battle that saw the loss of more than 30 million lives. We looked at major battles of the war, such as the Marne, the Somme, Verdun, Tannenberg, and Amiens, we study the armistice that ended the war, and the eventual "Big Four" meeting at the Paris Peace Conference that ended with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles.

Our third-trimester focus is to understand how the impact of the Great Depression around the world led to the growth of totalitarian regimes (Unit 5) in parts of Europe and Asia and how those regime's thirst for territory and power led to the second World War. We study how the financial ruins in countries across Europe led ordinary citizens to accept governance by murderous dictators under the promises of growth and prosperity. We examine Mussolini's rise in Italy, Hitler in Germany, Stalin in the USSR, and Hirohito in Japan. We revisit the Treaty of Versailles and its inability to safely re-construct Europe after WWI and to prevent a second world war from occurring. In our study, we look at Britain and France's attempts to keep the peace through appeasement and how this approach only led to a more powerful Germany, and in turn, a more powerful Axis Powers during WW2. We'll take a deep dive into specific pivotal events of WW2, such as the invasion of Poland, the fall of France, Pearl Harbor, the Battles of Stalingrad, El Alamein, Midway, and Guadalcanal. We'll also look at the invasion of Normandy- D-Day, the invasion of Italy, the Battle of the Bulge, and the use of atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. We will end the semester by learning about the horrific events of the Holocaust and the Nuremberg Trials.

  • American History, Grade 9

This year-long course is a survey of American history from the Pre-Columbian Era to the present. Units will cover the major political, social, economic, and cultural developments that have shaped the United States. Particular emphasis will be put on improving students' persuasive writing, their critical reading skills, and their analysis of primary sources. Students will also participate in the Chapman-Woodbury Oral History program as a part of the class.

  • Modern World History, Grade 10

This course surveys the themes, people, and events that define the modern world. Students examine Imperialism (comparing Ming Chinese and European explorations), forms of government (comparing the Ottoman caliphate, English constitutionalism, and French republicanism during the French Revolution), nationalism (comparing Mexican and Qing Chinese nationalist movements as well as the role of nationalism in the origins of the First World War), 20th century-ideologies (surveying fascism and communism around the world), and the fight for rights (including internationalism, decolonization, civil rights, and the end of the Cold War).

Math

  • Math, Grade 5

This course is aligned with the National Standards for fifth-grade mathematics and focuses on three critical areas. First, the students will become skilled at the addition and subtraction of fractions. They will continue to develop an understanding of the multiplication of fractions and learn to do some simple division of fractions. The students use the meaning of fractions, multiplication and division to understand why the processes for multiplying and dividing fractions make sense. Second, the students will expand their knowledge of division to include 2-digit divisors and decimal operations. The students will have mastered multi-digit addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. The students will learn how to add and subtract numbers with decimals to the hundredths. They also develop an understanding of the relationship between fractions and decimals. Third, the students will develop an understanding of volume as a property of three-dimensional space. They will learn how to approach and solve problems regarding the estimation and measurement of volume.

  • Math, Grade 6

Sixth Grade Math focuses primarily on four areas. First, the sixth-grade math student will continue to build on fifth-grade fractional concepts and relationships and expand on their understanding of fractional division. In addition, the student will extend their understanding of the number system and quantities to include working with rational numbers such as signed integers. They will also apply reasoning about order and absolute value with regard to the location on the coordinate plane. Also, the sixth-grade math student can expect to connect ratio and rate to whole number multiplication and division concepts in order to solve problems. Working on writing, interpreting, solving, and apply expressions and equations will be introduced in the sixth-grade math classroom, as well. This includes topics such as properties of operations, variables and equivalency. Finally, the sixth-grade math student will begin to develop their ability to think statistically by exploring measures of central tendency, measures of variability and data distribution.

  • Math, Grade 7

Seventh grade integrated math focuses on building skills in all five of the mathematics stands – Number System, Algebra, Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. We will focus on building computation skills, problem-solving strategies, improving communication with a mathematical focus, and reflecting upon the findings. The course will stress the essential role of mathematics within the school and in society: mathematics as a universal language, promoting analytical reasoning and problem-solving skills that contribute to the development of modeling and solving problems that arise in the real world.

  • Math SL, Grade 8

Eighth Grade Math is the culminating integrated mathematics course for Middle School students to prepare them for high school level courses. The course is an integrated, spiraling approach to several branches of mathematics. It builds on what students learned in grades 5-7 mathematics courses and delves deeper into the different branches. Students further explore topics in the Number System, Expressions and Equations, Functions-this begins the formal study of functions, Geometry, and Statistics and Probability.

  • Math HL, Grade 8

This course's rigorous curriculum will stretch student thinking, require robust problem-solving abilities, and strongly embrace technology. The course begins with a study of exponents and algebra, followed by units on functions, focusing on quadratics and exponential relationships, and continues with a journey through geometry and trigonometry. The course concludes with an introduction to statistics and probability.

  • Math Studies, Grade 9

The MYP Math Studies SL course is an integrated math course that will provide students with the presumed knowledge leading to future IB mathematics study. This course will give students the foundation and refinement of skills for the rigor and type of math that they will study in their sequential courses. This course concentrates on mathematics that includes not only general math skills but also refining and extending skills and knowledge in algebra. Included are also some geometry basics, along with a study of probability and statistics. A look at practical applications in mathematics is an important focus of the course. A detailed look at formulae and using and solving for specific quantities is another focus.

  • Math SL, Grade 9

The MYP Math SL course is an integrated math course that will provide students with the background information leading to the rigorous study of math at the DP level in 11th grade. This course concentrates on mathematics that includes topics from algebra, geometry, statistics, probability, financial math, trigonometry, and matrices. In each of the areas, the focus is on learning basic techniques and then applying them in higher-order problem-solving. The integrated approach allows skills learned in previous years to be reinforced and learned more in-depth. At the same time, new topics are incorporated and applied to prior learning.

  • Math HL, Grade 9

The MYP Math HL course is an integrated math course that will provide students with the background information leading to the rigorous study of math at the DP level in 11th grade. This course is designed for the student who has shown a propensity towards math and thus can move at a faster pace than the standard level. This course concentrates on mathematics that includes topics from algebra, geometry, statistics, probability, financial math, trigonometry, and matrices. Additional topics in variation, two variable analysis and logic will be studied. At the higher level, the topics will be looked at more in-depth compared to the standard level. In each of the areas, the focus is on learning basic techniques and then applying them in higher-order problem-solving. The integrated approach allows skills learned in previous years to be reinforced and learned more in-depth. At the same time, new topics are incorporated and applied to prior learning.

  • Math Studies, Grade 10

The MYP Math SL course is an integrated math course that will provide students with the presumed knowledge required for the IB course Mathematics Studies SL. This course will prepare the student for the rigor and type of math that they will study in their DP course. This course concentrates on mathematics that includes not only general math skills but also refining and extending skills and knowledge in algebra and geometry. Included is also some elementary trigonometry, along with a study of probability and statistics. A look at practical applications in mathematics is an important focus of the course. A detailed look at functions and their graphical representations will prepare students for the use of that concept as it is used in future math courses.

  • Math SL, Grade 10

The MYP Math SL course is an integrated math course that will provide students with the presumed knowledge required for the IB course Mathematics SL. This course will prepare the student for the rigor and type of math that they will study in their DP course. This course concentrates on mathematics that includes advanced algebra techniques, coordinate geometry extended to three dimensions, advanced trigonometry including identities, probability and statistics, applications of exponents and logarithms, matrices and transformations, and also an introduction to calculus. Included is a multitude of topics that integrate previous topics allowing students to have a deeper understanding and appreciation for the math they have learned up to this point.

  • Math HL, Grade 10

The MYP Math HL course is an integrated math course that will provide students with the presumed knowledge required for the IB course Mathematics HL. This course will prepare the student for the rigor and type of math that they will study in their DP course. The topics of this course include all those in the SL course at the same grade level yet will move at a faster pace and will delve into a higher level of applications of the mathematics learned. This course concentrates on mathematics that includes advanced algebra techniques, coordinate geometry extended to three dimensions, advanced trigonometry including identities, probability and statistics, applications of exponents and logarithms, matrices and transformations, and also an introduction to calculus. Included is a multitude of topics that integrate previous topics allowing students to have a deeper understanding and appreciation for the math they have learned up to this point.

Science

  • Science, Grade 5

The fifth-grade year is an introduction to the big three areas of science covered throughout the Middle Years Programme, which are Life Science, Earth Science, and Physical Science. This year, students will gain an overall perspective on scientific inquiry, along with the processes of experimentation and measurement. Students will need to collaborate, ponder, question, examine closely and be prepared to try multiple avenues in order to grasp the concepts we shall face throughout the course of the year. Of course, we will also have plenty of fun and excitement along the way.

  • Science, Grade 6

Sixth-grade students will be learning Earth and Space Science. As a part of the course, students will be using multiple sources, but their primary textbook is the McGraw-Hill Earth and Space IScience Online Textbook (2017). The Earth and Space Curricula includes three major sections: Geology, Weather and Climate, and Space. Throughout the year, students will actively engage in these three topics in conjunction with the MYP Year 1 science curriculum. While exploring geology, students will have the opportunity to explore major geologic topics including, but not limited to, the rock cycle, mineral and rock identification, geologic mapping, plate tectonics, geologic time, landforms, volcanoes, and earthquakes. As a part of the weather and climate section of the class, students will explore the water cycle, weather, climate, freshwater and saltwater settings, and natural resources. Finally, as a part of the space section of the course, students will explore the Sun-Earth-Moon system, the solar system, and stars and galaxies.

  • Science, Grade 7

In seventh grade Life Science, the students explore four disciplinary core ideas 1) From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes 2) Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics, 3) Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits, and 4) Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity. Throughout each unit, the students participate in a variety of hands-on activities and laboratory investigations. Through these tasks, the students build upon their science process skills, which guide them in answering questions, provide the methods for how to complete investigations, and aid them in interpreting data and understand the results.

  • Science, Grade 8

This course is a preparatory science course for Upper School physics and chemistry. The students will be reintroduced to scientific inquiry, including the scientific method, hypothesis writing, and experimental design. There will be an emphasis on critical thinking of experimental design and the peer-review process. Throughout the course, students will gain hands-on experience in scientific measurement, the use of laboratory equipment, basic science related math, and how to be safe in a school laboratory. After general science basics, the students will begin with an introduction to physics that will start with describing and calculating motion and forces, then move through an introduction to NNewton'slaws of motion and simple machines. Units on Energy and Matter will be transition units on the way to the chemistry portion of the course. Students will learn about the periodic table, the basics of chemical reactions, acids and bases, and will touch on some life chemistry before finishing the year with another physics unit on electricity and magnetism.

  • Biology SL, Grade 9

Biology SL: The Biology SL curriculum is designed as an entry-level course that gives students an opportunity to develop a working knowledge of biological concepts. It is designed to prepare them for college-level courses in biological sciences. Topics include cell structure and function, the chemistry of life, cellular division, and genetics. Students will be challenged to use critical thinking skills to solve problems presented in a laboratory setting. The course emphasizes uniformity as well as diversity among organisms. It also provides exposure to the history and philosophy of biological sciences and ethical questions.

  • Biology HL, Grade 9

While covering essentially the same core materials taught in Biology SL, the Biology HL goes into greater depth. Cellular processes are examined in detail, with additional time spent on chemical pathways of key processes, applied genetic studies and immunology. As in Biology SL, students will be challenged to use critical thinking skills to solve problems presented in a laboratory setting. The course emphasizes uniformity as well as diversity among organisms. It also provides exposure to the history and philosophy of biological sciences and ethical questions.

  • Chemistry Studies, Grade 10

This course is designed to prepare the student for college chemistry by providing the student with a fundamental understanding of the composition and structure of matter and the changes it undergoes. Content from this survey course includes atomic structure, reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, thermodynamics, organic chemistry and acid-base. Analytical thought is developed through the application of problem-solving skills to chemical computation and the use of the scientific method in laboratory investigations. Excel spreadsheet programming is introduced and used as a data analysis and graphing tool. Performing laboratory investigations and lab write-ups will be an integral part of the course. Chemistry SL will be paced faster than Chemistry Studies, which will affect the breadth and depth of the course material.

  • Chemistry SL, Grade 10

This course is designed to prepare the student for college chemistry by providing the student with a fundamental understanding of the composition and structure of matter and the changes it undergoes. Content from this survey course includes atomic structure, reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, thermodynamics, organic chemistry, and acid-base. Analytical thought is developed through the application of problem-solving skills to chemical computation and the use of the scientific method in laboratory investigations. Excel spreadsheet programming is introduced and used as a data analysis and graphing tool. Performing laboratory investigations and lab write-ups will be an integral part of the course. Chemistry HL will be paced faster than Chemistry SL, which will affect the breadth and depth of the course material.

  • Chemistry HL, Grade 10

This course is designed for the student who might be interested in pursuing a science major in college and/or a career in the sciences. The course content is similar to Pre-Diploma Chemistry SL, except that this course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of fundamentals and the course content is covered at an accelerated pace. Computer technology is integrated into some of the units of the curriculum. Analytical thought is developed through the application of problem-solving skills to chemical computations and the use of the scientific method in laboratory investigations. Excel spreadsheet programming is introduced and used as a data analysis and graphing tool. Performing laboratory investigations and lab write-ups will be an integral part of the course.

  • Physics SL

Physics SL provides a broad overview of introductory-level physics topics that include: one-dimensional and two-dimensional motion (or projectile motion) with motion graphs, classical mechanics and analysis using Newton's laws, conservation of momentum, conservation of energy, work and power, simple harmonic motion, electricity, simple circuits, magnetism, optics, special relativity and basic engineering principles. Students will focus on concepts using basic problem-solving skills, involving introductory level algebra and trigonometry. Excel spreadsheet programming is introduced and used as a data analysis and graphing tool. Laboratory exercises and projects (such as the egg-drop project and the mouse-trap car project) are an integral part of the course and provide a basis for student-centered interaction and application of real-world physics principles introduced in the lecture.

  • Physics HL

Physics HL provides an in-depth overview of introductory-level physics topics that include: one-dimensional and two-dimensional motion (or projectile motion) with motion graphs, classical mechanics and analysis using Newton's laws, conservation of momentum, conservation of energy, work and power, simple harmonic motion, electricity, simple circuits, magnetism, optics, engineering principles and modern physics topics including both special and general relativity and engineering principles. Students will focus on concepts and rigorous, multi-step problem solving involving fundamental algebra and trigonometry. Excel spreadsheet programming is introduced and used as a data analysis and graphing tool. Laboratory exercises and projects (such as the egg-drop project and the mouse-trap car project) are an integral part of the course and provide a basis for student-centered interaction and application of real-world physics principles introduced in the lecture.

World Languages

The Middle School language program in grades 6th through 8th asks students to devote themselves to the study of one world language (French, Mandarin or Spanish) for three years. During that time, language learners work toward reaching a level of linguistic competency that will allow them to be able to communicate meaningfully in real-world situations at a novice high to an intermediate low level.

Mandarin

  • Mandarin, Grade 5

This course is designed to builds students' understanding of the Chinese language and culture with themes and subjects that are relevant to their daily lives. At the beginning of the class, students will learn pinyin, Chinese radicals and strokes. The lessons are developed for fifth-grade students' level, including listening, speaking, reading and writing (w/basic grammar). The online lessons and activities will make learning fun, effective and get self-feedback from each lesson. After each lesson, students will discuss the topics, ask and answer basic questions, write and create basic sentences, read short texts with learned materials. Students will have opportunities to appreciate and understand Chinese culture and to explore different cultures around the world

  • Mandarin, Grade 6

At the beginning of the class, students are going to review lessons have taken before, and they will keep learning phonetic and writing system (including Chinese radicals and strokes). The course continues to learn the Chinese language and culture with themes and subjects that are relevant to their daily lives. The course focuses on students becoming fluent speakers, more sophisticated listeners through building reading comprehension and the creation of short essays. The online lessons and activities will make learning fun, effective, and get self-feedback from each lesson. They also get acquainted with relevant Chinese culture, which helps to compare/contrast differences around the world.

  • Mandarin, Grade 7

The goal of the course will keep practicing daily conversations to compare and contrast different cultures around the world. Students will also keep learning word structure, sentence grammar, paragraph structure with comprehensive readings to analyze and be a good problem solver; write short essays with all kinds of topics; understand dialogues by native Chinese speakers with complicated listening. The course will be expected to frequently present your own ideas and understand all examples in Chinese.

  • Mandarin, Grade 8

The goal of the course is for students to become proficient in the target language. More complex exercises that require good listening skills are practiced for students' understanding of dialogues by native Chinese speakers. It's expected for students to frequently present their own ideas and understand all examples in Chinese. During the various discussions about the cultural presentations, students shared their ideas and brought up inquiries about the significance of Chinese customs and their impact on history as well. The students were also encouraged to explore outside their classroom to try to incorporate their knowledge about other cultures into their daily lives.

Spanish

  • Spanish, Grade 5

In this course, students will focus on the three modes of communication-interpersonal, presentational and interpretive. Students learn how to meet and greet other people, go shopping, describe people, say where they are going, and what they will do when they get there. They are able to discuss a range of topics such as their favorite pastimes, their family and friends, celebrations, and vacation plans. They will be able to participate in conversations, present information, and understand essential written and audio texts. They also learn Spanish in terms of the cultures where it is spoken, so they learn the practices, products, and perspectives of the Spanish-speaking world as they learn the Spanish language.

  • Spanish, Grade 6

In 6th grade, students focus on acquiring the basic language skills they need to express themselves on very familiar topics. They learn to politely interact with others, give basic biographical information, and talk about school and home life using words, memorized phrases, and simple sentences.

  • Spanish, Grade 7

Our seventh-grade learners focus on communicating about self, others, and everyday life with increasing complexity. These students use memorized structures as well as sentences and some strings of sentences to participate in basic but authentic conversation on topics relevant to themselves and their peers, such as family traditions, leisure time, chores, and places in a community.

  • Spanish, Grade 8

In 8th grade, students use strings of simple sentences to participate in unfamiliar social interactions. They are also asked to memorize complex structures needed for them to successfully conduct transactions related to acquiring goods or services. Throughout the year, students will be asked to compare/contrast their daily routines, make plans related to travel, bargain in a market setting, and give instructions as to how to prepare a recipe. Students also share in Spanish about their personal experience with learning a foreign language, including their motivations, struggles, successes, and future goals.   

  • Spanish I

This course incorporates the three fundamental concepts of the International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle Years Programme (MYP): holistic learning, intercultural awareness and communication. A variety of engaging experiences will include but are not limited to direct teaching, projects, inquiry, discussions, peer evaluations, cooperative learning, differentiation, and practice through reading, writing, worksheets, games, songs, listening activities, and more. This course will introduce students to a variety of topics and vocabulary (greetings, calendar, family, numbers, telling the time, school life, hobbies and sports, locations, weather, clothing and food). Student work is evaluated according to the IB assessment criteria. In order to reach the end goals for each of the criteria, students will complete the following tasks: in reading comprehension, students will read and process between 200 and 300 words; in oral tasks, students will interact up to two minutes; in writing tasks students will write between 100 and 150 words. These will enable them to meet phase requirements to move on to the next phase. Although the textbook and its ancillaries will serve as the foundation of the course, various additional authentic materials will be used. The class is taught in Spanish and students are expected to speak in the target language. This course teaches phase 1 of the MYP curriculum.

  • Spanish II SL

This course incorporates the three fundamental concepts of the International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle Years Programme (MYP): holistic learning, intercultural awareness and communication. A variety of engaging experiences will include but are not limited to direct teaching, projects, inquiry, discussions, peer evaluations, cooperative learning, differentiation, and practice through reading, writing, worksheets, games, songs, listening activities, and more.This course will introduce students to a variety of topics and vocabulary (daily routine, food and meals, health, childhood, relationships and celebrations, technology, artistic expression and housing). Student work is evaluated according to the IB assessment criteria. In order to reach the end goals for each of the aforementioned criteria, students will complete the following tasks: at the end of phase 2 in reading comprehension, students will read and process between 400 and 500 words; in oral tasks, students will interact up to three minutes; in writing tasks students will write between 100 and 150 words. These are just suggested minimums to keep students proactively engaged and perform at the level that will enable them to meet phase requirements to move on to the next phase. Although the textbook and its ancillaries will serve as the foundation of the course, various additional authentic materials will be used. The class is taught in Spanish and students are expected to speak in the target language. This course teaches phases 1-2 of the MYP curriculum.

  • Spanish II HL

This course incorporates the three fundamental concepts of the International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle Years Programme (MYP): holistic learning, intercultural awareness and communication. A variety of engaging experiences will include but are not limited to direct teaching, projects, inquiry, discussions, peer evaluations, cooperative learning, differentiation, and practice through reading, writing, worksheets, games, songs, listening activities, and more. This course will introduce students to a variety of topics and vocabulary (daily routine, food and meals, health, childhood, relationships and celebrations, technology, artistic expression and housing). Student work is evaluated according to IB assessment criteria. In order to reach the end goals for each of the aforementioned criteria, students will complete the following tasks: at the end of phase 3 in reading comprehension, students will read and process between 600 and 700 words; in oral tasks, students will interact up to four minutes; in writing tasks students will write between 200 and 250 words. These are just suggested minimums to keep students proactively engaged and perform at the level that will enable them to meet phase requirements to move on to the next phase. Although the textbook and its ancillaries will serve as the foundation of the course, various additional authentic materials will be used. The class is taught in Spanish and students are expected to speak in the target language. This course teaches phases 2-3 of the MYP curriculum.

French

  • French, Grade 5

The MYP French Grade 5 course introduces the students to the basics of the French language and the cultures of French-speaking countries. Lessons will include commonly used vocabulary, grammatical structures, idiomatic expressions, and pronunciation. The trimester is organized into two main units: Greetings and Hobbies. The units cover a series of topics that allow the students to learn, practice and develop their language skills, collaborate with peers, foster creative thinking, and enhance intercultural understanding. Students enrolled in this class will complete checkpoints, formative and summative assessments to help them reach the learning objectives determined by the MYP program.

  • French, Grade 6

The MYP French Grade 6 course allows the students to develop a basic level of French language acquisition and explore the cultures of French-speaking countries. Lessons will include grammatical structures, commonly used vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, and pronunciation. Instruction focuses on the development of the students' speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills in French. The year is organized into four main units: school life, family, shopping, housing and lifestyles. The units cover a series of topics that allow the students to learn, practice and develop their language skills, collaborate with peers, foster creative thinking, and enhance intercultural understanding. Students enrolled in this class will complete checkpoints, formative and summative assessments to help them reach the learning objectives determined by the MYP. Various materials will serve as a foundation for the course.

  • French, Grade 7

The MYP French Grade 7 commits the students to a higher level of language acquisition and deeper cultural understanding of French-speaking countries. Lessons will include grammatical structures, commonly used vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, and pronunciation. Instruction focuses on the development of the students' speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills in French. The year is organized into four main units: housing and lifestyles, places, health, and travel. The units cover a series of topics that allow the students to learn, practice and develop their language skills, collaborate with peers, foster creative thinking, and enhance intercultural understanding. Students enrolled in this class will complete checkpoints, formative and summative assessments to help them reach the learning objectives determined by the MYP. Various materials will serve as a foundation for the course. The class is primarily taught in French and students are encouraged to speak in the target language as much as possible.

  • French, Grade 8

The MYP French Grade 8 course builds upon previous levels of language acquisition and deeper cultural understanding of French-speaking countries. Lessons will include grammatical structures, commonly used vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, and pronunciation. Instruction focuses on the development of the students' speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills in French. The year is organized into four main units: holidays, artistic expressions, daily routine and traditions. The units cover a series of topics that allow the students to learn, practice and develop their language skills, collaborate with peers, foster creative thinking, and enhance intercultural understanding Students enrolled in this class will complete checkpoints, formative and summative assessments to help them reach the learning objectives determined by the MYP. Various materials will serve as a foundation for the course. The class is primarily taught in French and students are encouraged to speak in the target language as much as possible.

Visual Arts

  • Visual Arts, Grade 5 - 8

MYP Visual Arts courses in Middle School at Lausanne encourage learning around the creative cycle – an ongoing process of sensing, planning, creating, and evaluating work. The Elements of Art and Principles of Design are the primary focus of the year, contributing to developing the foundation for creative ideas. Students will use various media to investigate concepts of culture, identity, and global perspectives as they develop their practice using the principles and elements of art as a foundation. Students will also have interdisciplinary learning experiences with our social studies, English, language, and science programs. We will explore concepts involving the environment, making personal connections within our art, and the art of different cultures and periods.

  • Art I  

This course is a combined studio art, artist influence, and art history class for the beginning high school student, with the general aim of improving student skills, building individual abilities, instilling art appreciation, and encouraging creative forms of expression. Studio art activities include drawing, painting, linear perspective and art form exploration. At the freshmen or sophomore levels, this course is intended to help prepare students for success in DP Visual Arts.

  • Photography

This course involves the study of analog and digital photography as both an art form and a technical skill. Areas covered include the history of photography, composition, development of the photographic eye, basic camera techniques and analog photographic chemical processing in a lab environment. During this course, students will become accomplished users of Adobe Photoshop software, producing digital work that engages all the fundamental elements and principles of visual art and design in order to develop the photographic eye. As the course progresses, students will produce work that reveals progress in technical skill, techniques in digital imaging, and emerging artistic expression. Students must maintain, for their individual use, a fully manual SLR 35mm film camera and provide film and photographic paper for use in class. Students must also own or purchase a digital camera for their individual use that has at least 4 megapixels resolution, different lighting/situation settings and optical zoom. A digital SLR camera is strongly recommended. Students are responsible for keeping a working and usable laptop computer throughout the course and providing batteries for use in their digital camera.

  • Advanced Photography  

This course is intended exclusively for students who have a sincere and enduring interest in the art of photography and involves the advanced use of a 35mm film camera, a digital camera, and Adobe Photoshop software skills in the pursuit of successful, varied forms of art photography. Students are required to reflect on the progress of their work by journaling and will encounter conceptual filters and scenarios as starting points for their creative expression in photography. The course concludes with a cross-curricular collaborative group project. Students must procure and maintain, for their individual use, a fully manual SLR 35mm film camera and provide film and photographic paper for use in class. Students must own or purchase a digital SLR camera that has at least 11 megapixels resolution, different lighting/situation settings and an optical zoom detachable lens. Students are responsible for keeping a working and usable laptop computer throughout the course and providing batteries for use in their digital camera.

  • Multimedia Arts

This course requires technical skills to integrate two or more forms of media. Students are provided an introduction to the creation of original digital works in the disciplines of logo design, digital illustration, infographic design, web design, animation, stop motion animation, and video editing using software applications such as Adobe CC, and iMovie, as well as HTML coding, CSS coding, and various other computer software applications and processes.

  • Digital Video & Special Effects

This course provides discrete development in the execution of original digital works in the discipline of digital video creation, editing, compositing and special effects using an iPhone, or a digital video camera, and software applications such as iMovie and Adobe Premiere, along with various other computer software applications. Students will become conversant with various cinematographic and video editing vocabulary and techniques.

  • Sculpture 

This course is an introduction to the basic elements, techniques, and history of sculpture. The student will focus on individual artistic development, using both traditional and nontraditional three-dimensional materials such as wood, plaster, metal, mold-making, and casting. Students will gain an appreciation for and knowledge of sculptural form through hands-on projects. Students will emphasize careful consideration of craft, form, space, site, presentation, and context. This course will provide a forum for the discussion and exploration of contemporary sculptural practices and the possibilities made available by such an expansive field. Whereas this is a studio-oriented class with a strong physical basis, this class will be examining these issues via readings, lectures, slides, videos, and other materials. During the last term of this year-long course students will work collaboratively to develop and create an art project that will be installed on Lausanne's campus—taking into consideration the following: the significance of placement in the public arena, awareness of the need for research, development of an artistic process, and the relationship that exist between the arts and the community.

  • Ceramics  

This course is intended for those studying ceramics for the first time. Students will explore a variety of hand-building techniques, including pinch, slab, coil, and extruded forms. The primary emphasis is on studio work leading to a portfolio of finished functional and non-functional pieces by the end of the first term. Students will be able to create as well as appreciate expressive, beautiful three-dimensional clay forms. Students will develop an understanding of other cultures and periods of human expression in clay and will begin to be proficient at forming clay objects themselves. Finally, students will learn to increase the scale of their work while keeping control over the quality, coherence, and contour of their work. Whereas this class is a studio-oriented class and involves a strong physical basis, we will also explore these issues via readings, lectures, slides, videos, and other materials. As the students enter term two they will become familiarized with advanced techniques such as the potter's wheel and principles of the clay medium. The development of personal expression and conceptual realization will be explored through a series of assigned projects. There is a technical emphasis on wheel throwing, hand-building, and surface techniques. During the last term of this year-long course students will work collaboratively to develop and create an art project that will be installed on Lausanne's campus—taking into consideration the following: the significance of placement in the public arena, awareness of the need for research, development of an artistic process, and the relationship that exist between the arts and the community.

Performing Arts

  • Theatre Arts, Grade 5

In fifth grade, students explore the tools of the actor (mind, body and voice) as powerful storytelling tools. They experience storytelling through pantomime and audio theatre as well as explore basic theatre vocabulary and the steps to creating a character.

  • Theatre Arts, Grade 6

In sixth-grade Theatre Arts, students build on their theatre experiences by sharpening their pantomime skills and telling their own stories through improvisation. Sixth-grade students will also learn to adapt, stage and perform Readers' Theatre.

  • Theatre Arts, Grade 7

Seventh-grade students explore theatre as a form of self and cultural expression. Through pantomime, audio theatre and basic playwrighting, students will learn how the theatre can serve as a narrative for the world around us.

  • Theatre Arts, Grade 8

In eighth grade, students begin to express themselves through playwrighting, performance and design. They will review previous Middle School lessons and make them their own by taking creative control over the stories they tell.

  • Theatre

This is an introductory class that explores all things theatre- onstage and off. Students will explore theatre history by gaining insight into the theatre of the past, present and future; participate in active learning sessions as they learn to paint with color and light in our theatrical design unit; and test their acting skills in our Scene study unit. This class is great for those with interest in theatre and who may plan on becoming involved in the DP Theatre Arts classes their Junior and Senior years. An appreciation of theatre and a willingness to have fun and explore their creative side are the main requisites for this class.

  • Theatre Production

This course presents students with basic design concepts in sets, lights and sound, along with instruction in the elements of stage direction. Students will practice and develop their skills in these areas which will be assessed as their work is utilized in actual staged performances during the fall US Production), winter (MS Musical) and Spring (US Musical, One Acts, LS Musical).
- String Ensemble:  The Upper School string students will expand on playing technique learned in previous years. Instruction will also include some music theory and music history as it relates to music selections. The majority of the music repertoire will be chamber music or small ensemble arrangements. Students will perform at school functions and special events.

  • Band

This course offers the opportunity to further instrumental music or band instruction begun in Middle School. Students will also continue their study of basic music theory skills, the keyboard, and music history. As students elect to continue the study of music, the student will be presented with greater challenges technically and musically. Emphasis is placed upon technical development and authentic stylistic interpretation of literature in addition to understanding the elements of music (i.e., melody, harmony, rhythm, form, timbre) and experiencing various music genres.

  • Chorus

The Upper School Chorus performs a wide range of traditional and contemporary choral literature in concerts both on and off-campus throughout the school year. In preparation for these performances, students will contrast and compare the stylistic characteristics of the works performed and associate various musical styles with other academic disciplines such as history and language arts. In this course students will acquire sight-singing skills, knowledge of music theory, and proper singing techniques. A student may elect chorus all four years.

  • Dance Performance

Dance Performance is a course designed for dancers to expand on their training by developing technique, exploring choreography, and honing their performance skills. The Fall trimester of Dance Performance will be spent exploring the choreographic and rehearsal process as preparation for performance. Students will learn both well-known and new works of choreography in a diverse range of genres that include jazz, contemporary, hip hop, and lyrical dance. In the Winter and Spring trimesters, students will study the elements of choreography and the creative processes of composing dances. Students will assume the roles of dancer and choreographer in developing improvisation, directing, and performance skills to produce and perform original group compositions. Dance Performance will culminate in a final performance designed to give students an opportunity to experience a professional level dance production. Students will learn how to perform all tasks required for production including technical design and stage management, costume design, hair and make-up for the stage, advertising and promoting for the arts, and all elements of the rehearsal process.

  • Dance For Athletes

This class is tailored specifically for the advanced athlete who wishes to increase their strength, agility, focus, and flexibility. Using a classical dance syllabus and the science behind biomechanics, athletes will gain higher levels of body awareness, a greater understanding of small motor skills, improved balance, and multiple techniques for developing more efficient lateral movement. This course's emphasis on precision— the exact placement of the head, arms, hands, legs, and feet in classical movement — will allow students to tune into each muscle as they gain an increased level of control over the body (which translates to better self-control on the field, court, or track). Students will also work on learning to shift their center of weight quickly and maneuvering from low to high levels as efficiently as possible. Students will also study basic injury prevention, nutrition, and the broader subject of exercise and sports science in this course.

Design

  • Design Curriculum – Grades 5 – 8

As a part of the interdisciplinary approach within the Middle Years Programme, the Design Model is integrated into the delivery and assessment of all core subject material. Within all subjects, students will Develop Ideas, Inquire and Analyze, Evaluate, and Create Solutions.  The Design instructor will work alongside Core Subject instructors to help support projects and labs which enhance the learning experience.

  • Advanced STEAM

Students who sign up for this class will be considered based on previous performance in STEAM.  Students must exhibit great time management, persistence when presented with a challenging task and motivation to try new things. RIOT stands for the following IB learner profiles:  risk takers, inquirers, open minded, thinkers. This course is designed for those who exhibit a passion for all things, STEAM.  Students will build, make, and destroy in order to make better, do better, be better!  Tasks will include but are not limited to robotics, engineering, maker's competitions through Instructables and Thingiverse.

  • STEAM Design Lab, Grade 7, 8

STEAM intertwines the multiple disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math into one curriculum.  Through experimentation and problem solving, students encounter real world applications of design. This unique department allows students to engage fully in every stage of the process – from conception and design to its physical production.  If students can dream the idea, STEAM possesses all the technology and tools to bring their visions to fruition. 

  • Industrial Design

This course seeks to expand student understanding of design theory as it relates to the three-dimensional world. Through a hands-on approach, students will explore modeling, carving, and assemblage while working primarily in wire, paper, Bristol board, corrugated board and foam core. Students will explore concepts of modularity, sequence and series, relief, contour, structure and symmetry. We will examine the function of space, volume, mass, plane, and line by solving design problems. The main emphasis of this course is the development of critical thinking skills and abilities to articulate visual ideas more fully as they apply to three-dimensional art forms, including sculpture, ceramics, architecture, and installation art.

  • Product Design & Development

This course explores the interdisciplinary aspects of product design and development. Topics include human-centered design, concept generation, classical design, Eco-design, material science, design-for-manufacturing, and design-for-disassembly. Approaches to marketing, design, and manufacturing will be emphasized. By completing hands-on projects, students will gain an appreciation for multiple industrial practices and for the essential roles played by various members of product development teams. Proficiency in the design process will be gained through theory and practice. At the completion of this course, students will have conceived, designed, and prototyped numerous products of their own conception.

  • Intro To System Design

Introduction to System Design is a course that focuses on the design process, research and analysis, teamwork, communication methods, global and human impacts, engineering standards, and technical documentation. This course gives students the opportunity to develop skills and understanding of course concepts on coding and implementation through active lessons and projects that will challenge students to think and develop interpersonal skills. It allows students to develop strategies to enable and direct their own learning. During this course, students will collaborate with other classes such as Product Design and Development to solve real-world problems. At the completion of this course, students will have conceived, designed, and prototyped numerous products of their own conception.

  • Programming As A Second Language

This is a first-year course in programming and introduces students to the concepts of data types, methods, and variables. Topics include conditional statements and loops, along with both searching and sort algorithms. The mechanics of running, testing and debugging code will be discussed. Students will learn to think through algorithms by both daily formative assignments and larger summative coding projects. No prior coding experience is necessary.

  • Yearbook Design

Students in this course will explore and apply the history, elements, principles, and aesthetics of two-dimensional design technology as well as classical tools and processes to execute a real-world product for publication, the Lausanne Yearbook, Horizons. Students who apply for this course will be required to attend some activities outside of normal school hours, for a grade, and also sell ads for the publication. Students are also encouraged to own their own digital cameras.